Tag Archives: self-government

The War of 1861

The 1783 Treaty of Paris ended the war between the colonies and Great Britain. Its first article declared the 13 colonies “to be free, sovereign and independent states.” These 13 sovereign nations came together in 1787 as principals and created the federal government as their agent. Principals have always held the right to fire agents. In other words, states held a right to withdraw from the pact — secede. Continue reading

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How to Bring Down a Republic

They indoctrinate, rewrite and lie about history, mock and distort religious beliefs, and promote a single progressive agenda. They discourage self-control and encourage hedonism (since, after all, any “mistakes” can be “fixed” by Planned Parenthood). Their goal is to achieve a massive universal groupthink populace incapable of questioning the government, much less governing themselves. Continue reading

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Enemy Inside the Gates: Cicero’s Prognosis and the Supreme Adjudication of ‘The Great Society’

Perhaps Benjamin Franklin knew what he was talking about when he told the young nation, after it had adopted its Constitution, in substance, that they had gained a free and independent nation but did not have the common sense to keep it. Continue reading

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Random Acts of Tyranny: NYC Pushing American Voting Rights for Foreign Nationals

There is perhaps nothing more cherished by the American People than their right to vote. It ranks right up there with private property ownership and freedom of speech. Voting is an honorable and enviable American tradition, a universal touchstone of self-government throughout the free world. Yet it is at risk of being undermined. Continue reading

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Why We Should Mistrust the Government

It should come as no surprise that President Obama told Ohio State University students at a graduation ceremony last week that they should not question authority and they should reject the calls of those who do. He argued that “our brave, creative, unique experiment in self-rule” has been so successful that trusting the government is the same as trusting ourselves; hence, challenging the government is the same as challenging ourselves. He blasted those who incessantly warn of government tyranny.

Yet, mistrust of government is as old as America itself. America was born out of mistrust of government. The revolution that was fought in the 1770s and 1780s was won in the minds of Colonists in the mid-1760s when the British imposed the Stamp Act and used writs of assistance to enforce it. The Stamp Act required all people in the Colonies to have government-sold stamps on all documents in their possession, and writs of assistance permitted search warrants written by British troops in which they authorized themselves to enter private homes ostensibly to look for the stamps. Continue reading

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On Liberty

THE subject of this Essay is not the so-called Liberty of the Will, so unfortunately opposed to the misnamed doctrine of Philosophical Necessity; but Civil, or Social Liberty: the nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual. A question seldom stated, and hardly ever discussed, in general terms, but which profoundly influences the practical controversies of the age by its latent presence, and is likely soon to make itself recognized as the vital question of the future. It is so far from being new, that, in a certain sense, it has divided mankind, almost from the remotest ages, but in the stage of progress into which the more civilized portions of the species have now entered, it presents itself under new conditions, and requires a different and more fundamental treatment. Continue reading

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The Meaning of Liberty

Our concept of liberty today is pale and thin compared with that of the Founders. Today we want to believe in liberty (small “l”), but not so much that we could get hurt. As long as we can still say what we want, worship as we please and have a vote, we say we have liberty. We expect that the government will prevent us from making mistakes, rescue us if we do make mistakes and provide for us if we fail. The founding generation wanted no restraints and accepted that they would have no safety net if they failed. This is a concept that is foreign to both of our main political parties today, and to most Americans in general. Continue reading

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West Point Issues Report on the “Far Right” Terrorists in America

If this article does not serve as a wakeup call for all those on the fence regarding who your loving government now considers a “terrorist” I don’t know what will.  The power structure loves to use language to divide and … Continue reading

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Secession: A Specifically American Principle

It is no exaggeration to say that the unique contribution of the eighteenth-century American Enlightenment to political thought is not federalism but the principle that a people, under certain conditions, have a moral right to secede from an established political authority and to govern themselves. Continue reading

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The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions: Guideposts of Limited Government

For true change to take place, Americans must once again conceive of their history as a struggle to create and maintain real freedom. Part of that reconceptualization would entail making a place for the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions in the pantheon of American charters. The resolutions articulate the fundamental principles of our government in an eloquent yet logical manner; in their import, they rank second only to the Constitution. For Americans who would recreate a limited federal government of enumerated powers — the government created by the Founders ­— the resolutions can serve as an enduring inspiration. Continue reading

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